South Sudan: Demonstration Memo To United State President, Congress, and UN

To; The President, United States of America,

Mr. Barack Obama

1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW

Washington, DC 20500

South Sudanese demonstrating at the United Nations Headquaters in Washington(Photo: Shared by Peter Kuel)

South Sudanese demonstrating at the United Nations Headquaters in Washington(Photo: Shared by Peter Kuel)

Your Excellency;

July 18, 2014(Nyamilepedia) — One of the most noticeable developments of the current conflict in South Sudan has been the suffering of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the Juba UNMISS compounds since December 15th 2013. Over whelming Nuer, these people fled to the UNMISS compound in order to save their lives from targeted killing of Nuer civilians government officials, and even soldiers in Juba after alleged coup attempt.

Unfortunately, lack of adequate supplies of food, sleeping quarters and water has made life in the compound enormously difficult. Men, women, children and elderly have had to sleep either in the open or in makeshift tenting. Now that the South Sudanese rainy season has arrived these IDPs are in danger of waterborne diseases such as cholera and insect-borne diseases such as malaria. Women have and continue to give birth in often unsanitary conditions posing a great risk to both mother and child.

The desperation of these conditions has led numerous individuals to leave the compound and take their chances in the city. Unfortunately, many of these individuals have lost their lives. A relatively recent case is the discovery of twenty decapitated Nuer men. Such cases tend to only reinforce the notion that Juba is not safe for Nuer people. The attack of civilian in the UN compound in Jonglei state, capital Bor, on 15th April by the armed youth.

Faced with the very real possibility and even likelihood that they will lose their lives, most IDPs have opted to take their chances with the hardship of compound life where it is undeniable that many will die of malnutrition and diseases. There are three solutions to this problem present themselves.

1/ The first is to relocate these IDPs to a proper UN Refugee camp where they can obtain food and suitable shelter.

2/ The second option is a quick resolution to the war in which an interim government ensures the safety of IDPs as they return to their homes regions.

3/ The third is President Salva Kiir must step down to allow peace to come and accountability for war crime and take him to “ICC”

For obvious reasons the third solution ought to be the preferred one.

The South Sudanese government has reiterated the argument that current regime retains its legitimacy because it was elected in by the people of South Sudan. Strangely this argument has been seconded by other states, but a considered look at the nature of this civil war may quickly dissolve this argument. If only for the rampant corruption that the current regime has encouraged Kiir’s government should lose legitimacy by declared the genocide against the Nuer tribe in December 2013, the current regime should lose legitimacy; how can such a regime continue to be considered as legitimate one in light of the gross violations of human rights it has committed as evidenced in the genocide of civilians from the Nuer ethnic group, Salva Kiir’s regime can no longer be considered a legitimate government.

To continue to assert that Salva Kiir’s regime is a legitimate one in the face of blatant crime against humanity, the gross misuse of state force, and its promotion of tribal orient and the culture of fear and corruption that has made it possible is paramount to condoning Salva Kiir’s actions, or at least to turn a blind eye to his atrocities. It is for this reason that we recommend that Kiir immediately should step down and allow peace to come and sanctioned by the United States for committed war crime against humanity.

In addition to condemning Kiir’s regime it is imperative that the IDPs be relocated to proper UN Refugee camps in neutral states. States like Ethiopia, kenya, Sudan and perhaps Uganda are the nearest neighboring states that would best fulfill this role. In fact these states are already fulfilling this role to some capacity. The necessity of such a move cannot be overstated. IDPs in Wau, Malakal, Juba, Bentiu and Bor are living in unacceptable conditions, the continuation of which will result in much loss of life among these communities.

Reports are clear that these IDP populations are the victims of repeated human rights violations that include continued targeted killing of Nuer civilians by South Sudanese security forces and Ugandan UPDF forces. What is more, the deplorable living conditions brought on by the constant rain have given rise to associated diseases like Cholera, TB and Malaria. This is aside from the mental illness that has affected many of these individuals. And to make matters worse, all of this is happening in what many observers have noted maybe the worst hunger crisis since the Ethiopian famine of 1983-85.

So to reiterate it is of the utmost importance that IDPs residing in the towns listed above be relocated to neighboring neutral countries. Aside from an immediate end to this war, there is no better way to save the lives of these IDPs. It is our hope today for this demonstration today at the front of our White House here on July 8, 2014 for call of United States that this proposal meets with the approval and quick action of the international community against brutal regime of dictator Salva Kiir.

Thanks,

Peter Gatkuoth Wadar Kuel

Chief Excecutive

South Sudan International Advocacy for Human Right

peterkuel@yahoo.com (206)393-2164

Signed:

Dr. GatluakDuopDieth

President,

Nile Peace Development Relief Agency of South Sudan

gatluakdd@juno.com (507) 396-2064

 

Signed:

South Sudanese Religious Leaders

Signed:

South Sudanese American Voice of Survivors

Thomas Tut Doap

Signed:

South Sudanese Women League

CC: The United States Congress

           Ms. Nancy Pelosi

           Minority Leader

CC: The United States Senators

Mr. Speaker of the House

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