South Sudan wildlife society says it has recieved support from United States group

South Sudan’s Boma park (File/Supplied/Nyamilepedia)

October 17th 2018 (Nyamilepedia) – South Sudan’s Wildlife Conservation Society announced on Tuesday that it has received a renewed support in the field of wildlife conservation of wildlife from a United States wildlife organization.

The support by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service’s International (USFWS) is the second in its kind since a similar donation few years ago.

The Phase two programme funded by the Wildlife Service’s International (USFWS) will be using innovative technology to support anti-trafficking and ivory stockpile management methods in South Sudan.

“Wildlife Conservation Society -South Sudan (WCS-SS) will continue [with] its anti-trafficking and ivory stockpile management efforts for a future and country with elephants” the South Sudan wildlife group said in a brief statement on its social media Facebook page.

The Wildlife Conservation Society-south Sudan (WCS-SS) is a nonprofit organization that values environmental importance and conserves the most endangered wildlife species in South Sudan.

Last year, a group of experts warned that illegal poaching and wildlife trafficking had been on the rise since 2013, the assessment was done in an effort to measure and evaluate the impact of South Sudan’s civil war on wildlife species.

South Sudan conflict has increased opportunities for illegal poaching, and put the lives of wildlife animals at risk. The availability of illegal weapons in hotspots is another factor that has resulted to illegal hunting according to the group.

South Sudan descended into civil in December 2013 following a flare-up of violence during a national convention for the ruling SPLM party which later on caused fighting within South Sudan Presidential Guards.

Unarmed civilians were targeted in the capital Juba that year leading to protest by top army generals from the SPLA, South Sudan’s army igniting revenge killings leading to civil war.

The conflict has affected South Sudan’s wildlife species as violence spreads to deep forests and remote areas.