Sudan releases South Sudanese 2012 war captives

Photo: South Sudan soldiers in Heglig

March 3rd 2020 (Nyamilepedia) – The Sudanese government has released 35 South Sudanese war prisoners captured during the 2012 Heglig crisis.

South Sudan’s then SPLA army took control of Heglig, a border oil-rich town claimed by Sudan and South Sudan, following days of aerial attack by Sudan.

The Sudanese government had accused South Sudan of harboring rebel movements fighting the regime of Omar al-Bashir in Khartoum.

Under international pressure, South Sudan army were forced to withdraw from Heglig while under aerial and ground attack by the Sudanese army.

The number of people captured in the war by Sudan was unknown but the government said only 35 were captured.

In September 2012, Sudan and South Sudan signed the Coorperation Agreement on which basis South Sudan army released around 13 Sudanese soldiers captured during the war.

Sudan had refused to release their war captives. Instead, the South Sudanese captured by the SAF were sentenced to death for “war and terrorism.”

“They were also charged with war and terrorism crimes against the state. When they were convicted, the government took them to the different prisons all over the country like in Shala of Darfur, Port-Sudan Kariri and Kobar,” Achol Malong was quoted by Eye Radio.

The human rights activist said some of the freed South Sudanese are Deng Kiir Nhial, Munir James, Kuat Kout Bak, Deng Kuat Deng among others.

“The government brought Deng Kiir Nhial to Kobar and they want to sentence him but amnesty international intervened and stopped the implementation of the death sentence.”

“Also Munir James from Unity State, Kuat Kout Bak, Deng Kuat Deng were convicted with death sentences. All of them are soldiers. They are 35 people and the authorities have released them.”

“They were captured during the Heglig war between the two countries in 2012. They fell in ambush and they were arrested and put in war prisons of Kariri and they were sentenced to death,” said the human rights activist.

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