Global Ambassador Djimon Hounsou Calls For an Arms Embargo On South Sudan

Djimon Hounsou in a cattle camp in Marial Bek, outside of Rumebek town in Lakes state during a visit to South Sudan as an Oxfam Global Ambassador(Photo: file)

Djimon Hounsou in a cattle camp in Marial Bek, outside of Rumebek town in Lakes state during a visit to South Sudan as an Oxfam Global Ambassador(Photo: file)

August 11, 2016(Nyamilepedia) —— Djimon Hounsou, actor and an Oxfam Global Ambassador, calls on Obama Administration to ensure the United Nations Security impose an arms embargo on the war-torn South Sudan.

Djimon, who visited South Sudan before the conflict in 2013, recounted the stories he witnessed first hand and related them to his earlier experience during his childhood in Benin where he witnessed at least two military coup de’tats.

Back then(March 2013), Djimon had no doubt that South Sudan was heading in a wrong direction and immediately called for a US-led arms treaty to control flow of weapons into South Sudan.

Although his earlier words felt on deaf ears, Djimon strongly stressed today in an Op-ed article published by NY Times that the US government must ensure that the UNSC impose an arms embargo in their voting process tomorrow on South Sudan in New York.

“But none of this will work if the parties to the conflict remain able to acquire weapons to continue their fighting. That is why we need the U.S. to ensure the U.N. Security Council imposes an immediate arms embargo on South Sudan.” Djimon said.

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The Oxfam Global ambassador believes that the US and UNSC have what could be their last opportunity to prevent a full-blown civil war in South Sudan if they take tough actions tomorrow.

He said the arms embargo would send a strong signal and help return peace and protect civilians in the world’s youngest nation.

“There is an opportunity right now to move members of the Security Council to impose an arms embargo to help ensure a return to peace and protect civilians. It will send a strong message that the international community will not enable those fighters who have shown a complete disregard for the laws of war easy access to weapons and ammunition with which they can rearm and commit or facilitate further abuses.” Djimon said.

Like many other observers, Djimon stresses that the United States’ leadership has not been shown by the Obama’s administration in the case of South Sudan.

“Leadership from the U.S. in the midst of this latest conflict has been lacking. Direct engagement from President Obama could make all the difference right now—that means speaking to the leaders to encourage an agreement that could lead to lasting peace, working with other world leaders and continuing to support the much-needed humanitarian effort.” he said.

Djimon also raised an important concern that the US government could work with the ordinary citizens if not the rival groups.

“It is also imperative that the U.S. works to involve ordinary citizens in South Sudan—not just those who have taken up arms. Conflict thrives in shadow; diplomatic light can make all of the difference.” Djimon said.

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